Magazine

The Child Character with Hitting Budapest

In as much as this piece is not intended a reflection, so total, an advocate for infantile representation in fiction. It is, rather, identifying and marking out the bounds of the different stages. However, this growing stage is denigrated because of its inexperience. But, we notice it’s an all-joy and most happy stage whose exuberance hits a possible reverie at a later time in life. In works featuring child and adolescent characters, the rapport displayed quite seem to imitate a big chasm. Because, on going back to such work you possibly calibrate it with your present development. Of course you may not have to let it at first! Rather, in such attempt, there’s a shutting out of the spontaneity of discussions-while not leaving off a supposed link and seeming gullibility of spewing on u...

Flash! The Seminar

           “It was that time of the day when ochre-like brightness stole on the earth like rays-when somewhat of an unusual scruple after a statistics talk was tossing us about; Jumbo and Slot, and myself. Jumbo was that soft spoken lad that every aura of respect hung stiff to, as though cologne. He has the lead. They have established both selves the strong picks without a tinge of doubt reposed anywhere in that crimson brick department, while every admiration was the easiest to afford on my part.       We sit on a concrete amusement bench. It owes its dense surrounding to the frangipani overhead. We sit to calculate the approximate number of talks that happen in the country. I had joined when not joining had left the realm ...

Book Review! Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Eleven years on, Storeadtime floats a review on this remarkably debut still roving giant strides. It was smartly written, with its thrills and aawh’s in proper gauge. A fiction that sets in south-eastern region Nigeria, cutting across a variety of spheres as at the time, and into the future. Politically, the novel is well armed with knowledge of its colonial history, while confronting the upheaval of the present and expecting a better democratic future. Culturally, it integrates the unique characteristic of the Igbo people’s festivity; masquerading, fast fading. Religiously, despite the many years behind after embracing the Catholic faith, there is a partly emancipation from the old traditional belief, as well as its continued headstrong practice. Purple Hibiscus is infused with eloquent o...

Short Story Review! Welcome to Bay Area by Sowmiya Ashok

Welcome to Bay Area is quite refreshing as well as wholly engaging unlike the many oaks one might find around. It is unapologetically contemporary as it explores one of the major deciding facets of today’s world. That is, the world technologically reduced into a nexus of networks. With the Silicon Valley as base, breakthroughs are masterminded by unrelenting brains around the world to break barriers between humans. While it is at once intriguing to find interactive Facebook, very social Whatsapp, and employment-oriented LinkedIn networks all present in the read. The writer at once shows dexterity in writing about the techie world with much coveted familiarity. Welcome to Bay Area infuses tales of the narrator “The Hindu journalist,” who meets with Gayathiri at the Inchin Bamboo Garden...

Book Review! On Becoming… by Toke Makinwa

This silver-tongued tale about the author, which she tells by herself opens up with a devastating confession, and the difficulty accepting a deed in uncontrollable sobs. And having the motivation to do what might be called the needful; “I ask him to leave. It is close to 11pm on a Thursday night but I don’t care, pg5.”  What ordinarily she could have allowed to lay bay as at the first instance in the novel. A reaction she had not thought of in a stretch of years she had been with Maje. The author and chief character; Toke Makinwa, On Becoming… relates the sweet memories of a together, loved up ‘brown’ family. With their challenges confronting them, they had high hopes and better aspirations still. Until all came gracing the floor in bitty shreds due to the inconsistencies heavy and po...

Short Story Review! ‘Greetings from a Violent Hometown’ by Ritu Monjori Kalita Deka

   ‘Greetings from a Violent Hometown’ is a short piece seen in the eyes of a young Indian girl, whose homeland is scattered into smithereens, so much she wants her father to scoop the family to America. The voice is a personal narrative in present continuous tense, dotted with see through words that go all the way to heaven and back in keeping the piece done and dusted. While being culturally alive.    Because of the too many things that have happened in the past, yet continue to happen. The narrator is grieved at the prospect of not having any birthday celebration, so far these things lingered. She, before things were caught up in insurgency, is able to trace the start; when owls swarm around with hoots, and with an extra hoot-the hoot of death, foretold the future, n...

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