Reviews

Uchenna feels a breathe of fresh air in Nnaji’s Lionheart

"What I love most about Lionheart is that it is not a sell out."

Netflix goes to Nollywood

“Lionheart” is only partly a movie about how a woman takes charge of a company in a sexist society. Although the film’s description implied a focus on a feminist perspective on business, it lacked any real exploration of the subject. It also failed to have any feminist ideals. For example, a man still ended up solving the company’s bankruptcy problem and essentially saving the day. Along the way, “Lionheart” offers sidelong observations about the importance of preserving a family legacy; the need for comity among Nigeria’s classes and ethnic groups; and the wisdom of older generations, even when change is necessary. It is globally minded filmmaking that is also comfortingly familiar.

Book Talk Gallery: Tomi and George’s Pieces of Me at Ignite Foundation Africa

We bring you highlights of Tomi Adesina’s book talk at Ignite Foundation Africa. George’s Pieces of Me. Though it’s coming way too later, it is worth it. Photos: The Anonymous Cherif  

Review of God’s Children are little broken pieces .By Arinze Ifeakandu .

Review of Gods children are little broken piecesByArinze Ifeakandu Wow! is what escapes from your mouth in this gripping and mind bugling story by Ifeakandu. His story is dipped in a pool of simple but well crafted words that reveal the emotions of his character at its length and breadth. It is fast paced with an almost perfect usage of words. With this one Ifeakandu presents a 3D narrative that you will want to read. The work is centred on the love lost between Kamsi and Lotanna; a not-usual kind of love for folks in this part of the world where that kind of love is highly frowned at.Ifeakandu here joins the increasing number of contemporary Nigerian writers and other writers in Africa broaching the controversial issue of gay sexuality especially in the African society. He perfectly paint...

The story of the girl whose birds flew away- Bushra al-Fadil

The short piece ‘the story of the girl whose birds flew away’is but a translation from its original language- it all the more tags it some specialty reinforced by a never-drop-it-down feeling until it is read through and again. It is voiced in a personal narrative. Equally, it is enchanted with poetic words that dot the length and breadth of the story, while not letting off the tropes that make it more appreciated. ‘… Whose birds flew away’raises unanswered questions about finding fulfilment, feeling secured.   It was sometime in summer, a day fresher than a normal summer day. The self acclaimed son of a Central Station, though awake and descending into the street was convulsed from hunger and the hopeless search for work but trimmed his neck to see a car accident or the commotion of ...

Short Story Review! Broken Rice by Bijoyeta Das

The short piece titled ‘broken rice,’ set in Dehradun, India, is packed with talking colours and walking spices. It opens in the first paragraphs with a social consciousness, which is more broadened in today’s world than in the disturbing past of its host society. It is the socio-economic classes of; low, lower middle, middle-middle, upper middle, high, VIP and VVIP. The fine piece progresses in layers of development; as a kid, teenager and adult, with all of life evolving before him. However, as a still growing kid, the narrator is confronted by the challenges of the aforementioned middle class his family was stapled to. It is more typified in his family scooter, a scooter he hated to ride on. With much uneasiness associated with it-the onrushing wind, hands that would not tie around his ...

Short Story Review! Fancy-Nancy’s Skullduggerous Drudgery of Love by Cara Marks

Like the former short story review episode that has the specialty of a theatre, Fancy-Nancy’s is planted on the theatrics of pre to post theatre set-up and organization. We read the story in the eyes of Nut Mag. With the beginning seeming like a gathering of ambers for a lit up, in same fashion as Greetings from a violent homeland. And the resolve almost like uncontrollable flames the ambers are to feed. The theatre group is headed by puffy Ms. Fatima and a whole array of forty students with a capricious dispersion of their ages between twelve and seventeen as subordinates. Hosted by their ginormous theatre community. The roles are assigned. For werewolf-wolf, there is Jon at twelve, mostly known as Fancy-Nancy and his best friend; Blueberry, an African-Canadian from Saskatchewan. And ther...

Short Story Review! Ophelia by Breanne Mc Ivor

Just as he, Marcus Blackman, imagines, a kiss with Ophelia that would start slow and rise in crescendos. Likewise, the short piece rises beyond the sprawling National Academy as both rehearse for a billed joint performance for the Performing Arts.Over the years, Marcus had first been in this theatre as a secondary school student. With nostalgic feelings he recants a woeful experience then at the theatre that shows in no small measure the stature of his family, socially. While not leaving off that a continued stealing and diversion of Government-sponsored grant would always impoverish people it were meant for. Because of such case, the inner linings of his stomach were wrenched from hunger for someone had stolen Government-sponsored lunch pack. Coupled with his mother who had been trying he...

Book Review! Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Eleven years on, Storeadtime floats a review on this remarkably debut still roving giant strides. It was smartly written, with its thrills and aawh’s in proper gauge. A fiction that sets in south-eastern region Nigeria, cutting across a variety of spheres as at the time, and into the future. Politically, the novel is well armed with knowledge of its colonial history, while confronting the upheaval of the present and expecting a better democratic future. Culturally, it integrates the unique characteristic of the Igbo people’s festivity; masquerading, fast fading. Religiously, despite the many years behind after embracing the Catholic faith, there is a partly emancipation from the old traditional belief, as well as its continued headstrong practice. Purple Hibiscus is infused with eloquent o...

Book Review! On Becoming… by Toke Makinwa

This silver-tongued tale about the author, which she tells by herself opens up with a devastating confession, and the difficulty accepting a deed in uncontrollable sobs. And having the motivation to do what might be called the needful; “I ask him to leave. It is close to 11pm on a Thursday night but I don’t care, pg5.”  What ordinarily she could have allowed to lay bay as at the first instance in the novel. A reaction she had not thought of in a stretch of years she had been with Maje. The author and chief character; Toke Makinwa, On Becoming… relates the sweet memories of a together, loved up ‘brown’ family. With their challenges confronting them, they had high hopes and better aspirations still. Until all came gracing the floor in bitty shreds due to the inconsistencies heavy and po...

Short Story Review! ‘Greetings from a Violent Hometown’ by Ritu Monjori Kalita Deka

   ‘Greetings from a Violent Hometown’ is a short piece seen in the eyes of a young Indian girl, whose homeland is scattered into smithereens, so much she wants her father to scoop the family to America. The voice is a personal narrative in present continuous tense, dotted with see through words that go all the way to heaven and back in keeping the piece done and dusted. While being culturally alive.    Because of the too many things that have happened in the past, yet continue to happen. The narrator is grieved at the prospect of not having any birthday celebration, so far these things lingered. She, before things were caught up in insurgency, is able to trace the start; when owls swarm around with hoots, and with an extra hoot-the hoot of death, foretold the future, n...