Culture talk

The relatability of Lionheart and the one world barrier

While Lionheart is an enterprising original home video that talks business- it is also a story “following Adaeze (Genevieve Nnaji), a competent yet perennially overlooked daughter, who is forced to work alongside her feckless uncle, Goodwill (Nkem Owoh), in order to save her father’s (Pete Edochie) ailing bus company…” Konbini. Of its relatedness, Lionheart is culturally bounden because it flicks through the interstices of what makes us human than not- love, pain, negligence and the likes. It borders on the emotional make up of the person. Sure Lionheart appeals, identifying with being human, notwithstanding coming limited and holed up by the barrier of language. However, Lionheart inaugurates the directorial career of one of Africa’s biggest screen stars, (Ge...

One good thing being African

Step out to an occasion and you’d be glad if you had that intricately designed piece of Miriam Makebe or the Addis-ababa, because they are just too good to turn down. One good thing being African can be surmised as ‘everything good will come.’ And it comes not vaguely but surreptitiously in the wide spectacle of typical African prints that know no bounds. Down the years, African women especially the Igbo have found expression and unanimously embraced creative art fabrics that come in wax, java and other formats. That was in the 60’s, textured in black and white. And now there’s a wider testament by a whole population, continent and beyond that have continued to identify with the heritage. While this traditional heritage stamps a definition of African culturall...

Nigerian rambunctious TV drama shows ideal culture

Cast in the rock dotting grounds of Enugu, Nigeria, West Africa. The Prof. JB, short for Professor Johnbull fits as the TV drama we are seeing in the weekend. Prof. JB is a show of drama series (social satire) sponsored by the Globacom with a knack for drawing home; termed ordinary lessons that matter so much. In the particular season 4 and episode 4, going by their progressive method of paginating themes, the points in the podcast are sourced from the scenes. Scenes that could be described as collections of problems, and spontaneously they grow further into some counter positions. Given the contrast of the counter positions, the hard core indelible lessons are drawn. The TV drama has a focus on objectivity of assumption, suppositions and reservations about cultures there are. And with eye...

A trip to Nigerian barbecue stand. Alias suya stand

Suleiman Abubakar, Sule for short, was a Nigerian, from the northern state of Sokoto. This much detail Sule’s buzzing customers knew and flaunted, but it wasn’t the much he said. Only that other pronunciations of his L.G and hometown were never arrived at with correct shaping of the mouth and twisting of the tongue. Nigeria was as large as the earth for greener pastures and adventure, taking Sokoto to be somewhere in the north, he sloped down towards the south then drifted to ply his trade in the East. Sule, jovial as he was, and as every indication pointed he should be, burnt his way through the heart of the Easterners roasting skewered beef, alias suya. Joviality could earn a name, and it walked up Sule to be addressed as Aboki. It may have well been imagined as derogatory at...

How Stories Matter

…Onyeulo Noel O. Because of how close we are to stories, with chuckles; closer than you ever imagine. With Noel, we point you how stories matter, to you as a person and to us as a people. The great Indian Jesuit priest and Story writer, Anthony de Mello once said that the shortest distance between truth and a human being is a story. Stories guide human beings in their search for truth and meaning of life. We should be concerned about the stories we digest because they form part of how we relate with events, peoples and places. Stories are like imaginative vehicles through which we travel to places either factual or fictional. Stories create most times a definitive picture of our believe system; whatever we know about an event, people and places are most often an aftermath of stories ...